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NEWS AND CURRENT PROJECTS

Entry for Urban Design Competition: Jamsil Olympic Complex, Seoul, Korea...
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Project for Community School Building, Chyne, Czech Republic...
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Studio awarded EIGHTH PLACE in International Urban Design Competition: Plovdiv, Bulgaria...
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Studio wins THIRD PRIZE in International Housing Competition...
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| 2013 | THROUGH AND BETWEEN : city block housing competition, belgorod, russia
| 2012 | re-thinking existing house, balerno, edinburgh
| 2012 | INCIDENTAL : helsinki library competition
| 2011 | low cost housing competition, luanda, angola
| 2011 | alterations and extrusion to house, edinburgh
| 2011 | competition for urban strategy involving reprogramming of brussels courthouse
| 2010 | project for 100 metre high fashion museum in tokyo's fashion district
| 2010 | rooftop additions to tenement, edinburgh
| 2008 | anabo housing concept
| 2008 | remodelling of basil spence apartment, edinburgh
| 2008 | remodelling and extrusion to house, north berwick, scotland
| 2008 | remodelling and extrusion of house, edinburgh
| 2007 | restaurant remodelling and refit, edinburgh
| 2006 | restaurant, edinburgh
| 2006 | miscellaneous small projects, edinburgh
| 2006 | NEGOTIATING SCALES : housing competition, herning, denmark
| 2006 | house extension, edinburgh
| 2005 | house on landlocked site, edinburgh
| 2004 | inhabitation of existing outhouses, edinburgh
| 2004 | remodelling of camera obscura and associated exhibitions, edinburgh
| 2004 | housing competition, newcastle, england
| 2003 | restaurant on existing mechanical bridge, edinburgh
| 2002 | arts project for school, fortrose, scotland
| 2002 | remodelling of photographic gallery, edinburgh
| 2002 | canal side terrace and remodelling of tenement, edinburgh
| 2001 | high density housing competition, aomori, japan
| 2001 | kitchen concept
| 2001 | apartment building, edinburgh
| 2000 | prototypical pavilion, lockerbie, scotland
| 2000 | apartment building, edinburgh
| 2000 | apartment building, lanarkshire, scotland
| 1999 | remodelling of 17th century house, edinburgh
| 1999 | central scotland forest housing competition
| 1998 | diner, edinburgh
| 1997 | bar, edinburgh
| 1997 | shop, edinburgh
| 1997 | house, edinburgh
| 1996 | apartments and studio, edinburgh
| 1995 | conference table system
| 1995 | furniture for chapel royal, stirling castle, scotland
| 1995 | scottish architecture and design centre, competition, edinburgh
| 1995 | speculative houses
| 1994 | ronaldson's wharf housing competition, leith, edinburghh
| 1994 | project for old town renewal trust offices, high street, edinburgh
| 1993 | remodelling of ground floor flat, edinburgh
| 1992 | bar, edinburgh
| 1992 | remodelling of tenement flat, edinburgh
| 1992 | remodelling and attic conversion, edinburgh
andrew stoane architect

+44 (0)131 552 0222 | mail@andrewstoanearchitect.co.uk | youtube | WEBSITE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION BY ANDREW STOANE

news and current projects
andrew stoane
the studio
Andrew Stoane first established an architecture studio in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1992. He currently splits his time between running the studio,and teaching at the city's ESALA school of architecture, where he is involved in both undergraduate and postgraduate programmes. The studio simultaneously operates an architectural practice and a think tank for more speculative strains of architecture. Together, these three complementary components enable outputs which are focussed, questioning and relevant.
The studio is located in Edinburgh, Scotland, in the base of an apartment building by Basil Spence. It comprises two symbiotic components :
The architectural practice, which is dedicated to realising conceptually rigorous and meticulously detailed projects across all sectors and scales, and the think tank, which tackles more theoretically focused and speculative work across varied disciplines. The think tank gives students and young architects the opportunity to collaborate over thematic investigations in a professional environment.
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The studio operates beyond the conventional limits of architectural practice, synthesising its think tank discoveries into attitudes which often transfer into other industries. In addition to architectural projects, the studio accepts commissions for furniture, products, graphics, web, style advice and fashion forecasting.
Cultural analysis and speculation underpins all the studio's work and usually forms the basis of textual presentations. The studio accepts research and writing commissions based on established or new themes. Synopses and excerpts from some texts can be viewed here.
These projects are a selection of the work undertaken by the studio from 1992 to the present day.Presented chronologically, the selection shows the diversity of the studio's work. A brief textual explanation attempts to convey something of the consistent attitude or thought processes running through the work. Hover over the thumbnails for a brief description, click for more information.
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complementary work
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andrew stoane architect | anabo TM
9 laverockbank avenue
edinburgh
EH5 3BP

mail@andrewstoane.com
mail@anabo.org

www.andrewstoane.com
www.anabo.co.uk

00 44 131 552 0222

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The fashion tower experience is built on 2 principal thematic studies : 1. Survival strategies for contemporary museums - the necessary support of the 'cultural' programme by the 'commercial' programme? 2. The paradox of archiving fashion : an industry which leaves no residue which can ever be considered as mute. The constant and direct re-appropriation of styles and influences, always in a state of flux. These two studies influence an overarching organizational structure for the tower based on hybridization, rather than separation. The fashion tower sees the cultural and commercial agendas of a ‘museum’ programme as symbiotic rather than exclusive. We aim to create an environment where neither shopping nor archive dominate but the two are mixed together into one experience - an experience equally related to zeitgeist and retrospective. A 100 metre tall museum and a ‘loose-fit’ programme present unique organizational challenges. The fashion tower addresses this by splitting the movement system into two components : 1. a continuous slow unfolding vertical landscape containing exhibition, which unfolds into events such as an auditorium, runway, bar and nightclub.[[tetra diagram]], 2. a supporting inner skewer of containment and rapid infrastructure (human and mechanical). High speed lifts transport humans, whereas the revival of an ancient mechanical device - the paternoster, (a kind of continuous vertical conveyor belt) [[diagram]]allows clothes, accessories and exhibits, originating in a highly organized subterranean robotized warehouse, to be circulated and deposited anywhere within the tower’s 100m height. [[diagram]]. Via the paternoster, the ‘archived’ items become part of the constantly changing exhibition but also have the potential to become shop stock, either directly or through influence. We introduce a 100m metre tall vertical shop, sculpted like a giant totem pole to allow relationships between the paternoster and the public at key points in each district. At every ‘shop’ level, the public will be able to access the museum’s data base to interactively visualize influences, trends and genealogies of individual pieces, calling items from the paternoster, composing outfits, dressing in them and projecting their own image onto the interior of the media skin. The exhibition is never static and never needs to close to re-organise. Under the direction of, not a curator but an EDITOR, the fashion tower becomes a new way of communicating fashion – as if the pages of a magazine are laid out in the spaces of the city [[diagram]]. The editor uses the fashion tower to simultaneously communicate speculative and retrospective ideas : Exhibition is no longer constrained by the architecture of its container, but fully liberated by it. Five different ’districts’ are separated vertically by open landscaped public spaces - moments of pausing, orientation and reflection - landmarks throughout the vertical journey. The districts can operate independently or as one continuous experience, allowing different layers of public involvement and providing multiple commercial opportunities for event hosting and organization. Transitions between districts always occur through the infrastructural skewer, meaning accessibility can be completely controlled to any part of the tower. Districts can therefore operate on independent time frequencies. The ground plane is left open, forming a new street level public space off Omotesando Street, landscaped to encourage viewing of the external runway, suspended 3 metres up. The main internal runway, which projects out over the space, allows public viewing when the media façade is not switched on. The fashion tower is effectively able to be read as a vertical piece of the city, with streets, public spaces, shortcuts and mechanical rapid transit devices. Each district is wrapped in continuous stainless steel lamellae with integrated LEDs, able to simultaneously communicate media both externally to the city, and internally to the museum. There is no bottom, top or sides, only a single skin, able to communicate in infinite directions. By varying density and proximity to the glass façade behind the lamellae also act as solar shading to the glass facade. [[diagrams]] The combination of experiential ideas behind this project yield an architecture which generates an extraordinary silhouette. This will become recognizable as an international symbol of fashion, initiated in Tokyo but representative of status of world fashion capital - both unique and ubiquitous. Ultimately, like much of its content, the fashion tower and the experience it embodies, becomes a global brand.
Jamsil Olympic Complex, Seoul, Korea . International Urban Design Competition, carried out with invited team of Second Year undergraduate students.
PROJECT TEAM : Andrew Stoane, Ruotian Wang, Felix Yates [with assistance from Clyde Russell, Kate Le Masurier].

The competition brief looked for strategic ideas for re-programming the now redundant areas around and between the Olympic stadia to form the new Seoul 'Exchange District' , containing sports, MICE, commercial and leisure activities. The extreme cyclicality of the area's activity was analysed and indexed. Mapping the temporal index against the programme led to the idea of a 'matrix' - a dense, low, multi-programmatic structure which could fill the temporal voids left by the low frequency cycles of the stadia. The matrix would behave like a sponge, absorbing the cyclical extremes generated by sports and expo events. It would be continually occupied, day and night, retaining the huge footfall on site through commercial, leisure, hospitality and hotel accommodation, creating an economic power node within the city. The project aimed to stimulate a public realm which reverses the trend for a simplified scenographic view of the city, instead proposing a site which would promote a complete homology between inside and outside, contacted to a 'full temporal calendar'.
School Building, Chyne, Czech Republic.

The project brief required the school building to simultaneously act as learning institution and publicly accessible community facility. The building is over 130 metres long, 14 metres tall and is pure white. Walls of 600mm thick white concrete extend North-South mediating between the small town of Chyne and the unbuilt landscape to the South. This porous new landscape forms the shared public part of the programme - gymnasiums, pool, hydrotherapy centre, auditorium, cafeteria and library. Perpendicular full storey long white concrete walls form the school above and provide long span beams over the large scale facilities below. The building's spatial system fully reciprocates with its structural logic - teaching 'lines' defined by full height beams. The lines determine the school's educational stages. Each classroom has an adjacency to a perpendicular strip of classroom gardens. The gardens extend the perception of the classroom volumes, bringing in light and air and providing relaxation areas. Each pair of classrooms has dedicated cloakrooms, toilets and storage. The main school garden at the end of the lines acts as an extension to the glazed foyer which amalgamates the individual school stages around the circulation cores.
City Square, Plovdiv, Bulgaria, International Urban Design Competition, carried out with invited team of Second Year undergraduate students.
PROJECT TEAM : Andrew Stoane, Alice Mears, Nutthanee Banditakkarakul, Lucy Allen, Nicola Murphy.
Shortlisted - Eighth Place.

Each age has left a new layer on Plovdiv's main square, from Imperial Rome's Forum, Basilica and Odeon to the Communist administration's Central Post Office and Party Headquarters. The municipality desctibe it as :'an emblematic location where most of the significant historical periods of the city overlap. A solution for their untroubled co-existence is yet to be found.' The competition required proposals for cohesion, alongside continued excavation and exposure of Roman antiquity. The project aims to reconcile the presence of both republics - ancient and modern. It celebrates all aspects of life beyond the jurisdiction of the individual - publicness. Continued excavation of a single surface would only exacerbate the fragmentation of the square. Our approach therefore involved transgressing conventions of 'surface' - the reconsideration of the site as an inter-reliant two layer system around which a new cohesive municipality could be orchestrated.
International Ideas Competition for Future Private Rental Market Communities.
PROJECT TEAM : Andrew Stoane, Neil Cunning. 3rd Prize .

A variant of the anabo concept, MARKETplace posits a psychological shift from 'empowerment by commoditisation' toward 'empowerment by partnership'. Land and architectural 'infrastructure' are owned by a corporate entity of which house renters become partners. Ground and frame rents are paid to the company but components of individualisation can be leased or purchased - panels, screens, partitions, kitchens, bathrooms, brassware, appliances, trees... Crucial to the concept is the ability to trade these components in both a physical and a virtual marketplace : THE PHYSICAL MARKETPLACE is the heart of the community - a public garden through which the community continually re-organises its physical make-up, trading, swapping, selling and buying components as lifestages and lifestyles change. THE VIRTUAL MARKETPLACE takes place via an embedded touch-screen in every house which, in addition to controlling all systems, gives space on the MARKETplace server. This provides useful services, allows neighbourhoods to be explored and house types to be examined, selected and personalised using the 'configurator'. Construction waste and product obsolescence are massively reduced.
The introduction of a new housing typology to a low density city block adjacent to one of the city's main boulevards. The brief demanded a viable development density using 'symbolic' architecture, while maintaining a low building height. First, a horizontal plinth is inserted into the site. Exploiting the slope, the plinth is then inhabited at the boulevard with shops and cafes, and deeper into the site with subterranean parking and servicing. On top of the plinth, the boulevard's 'garden' is repeated in a series of new lines running East-West and diminishing in publicness northward. Lengths and proximities of these garden lines are determined by their ability to strengthen existing site conditions. Apartments are laid out along the lines, 'floating' over the site. Neighbourhood paths make perpendicular connections, running through glazed stair cores, expressed as voids in the blocks. The resulting matrix of interconnected territories engages this architecture in the city. Although the strongest symbolic elements of the scheme are the lines of apartments, in a way, they become the residual elements. This is a project which is about porosity - the spaces through and between.
The project, currently on site, re-thinks a family's expanding inhabitation of an existing unloved 400sqm timber framed house on a mature site in Edinburgh's suburbs. Fairly fatal problems with the existing house - poor orientation; lack of engagement with site and a convoluted internal arrangement - prompted a design strategy of holistic re-organisation rather than that of a single large extension. The budget was evenly distributed around the property rather than being sunk into one statement addition, which could never resolve, and may even exacerbate, the issues of the existing house. Three distinct, but communicating, territories for three generations of family are created, with an attempt to raise awareness of the unique site from within each.
The project explores the democracy of knowledge. This prompts an overriding strategy of porosity, where the library becomes more of a city 'event' than a 'building'. It responds to a range of use scenarios from the 'completely incidental' to the 'fully absorbed'. The plinth of the classical institution is replaced by the democracy of institutional absence - publicness.
Located in Helsinki's Toolonlahti park and surrounded by many of its main cultural buildings, the library aims to fuse two conditions : containment (building) and landscape (park). First, it reinforces the edge of the park, already set up by new buildings lining its east side. Six steel towers rising from the park simultaneously create the edge and act as a filter to pedestrian movement from the city's main bus and train stations, allowing the library programme to be engaged in multiple ways. Only the physical artefacts are contained in the towers, which can be locked like packing cases. Any further institutional thresholds are dissolved and knowledge disseminated in the spaces between the towers. These alternating open and closed garden spaces give an equal priority to inside and outside. Library and park become entangled.
The Tokyo fashion tower is built on 2 principal thematic studies : 1. Survival strategies for contemporary museums - the necessary support of the 'cultural' programme by the 'commercial' programme.
2. The paradox of archiving fashion : an industry which leaves no residue which can ever be considered as mute.
High speed lifts transport humans, whereas the revival of an ancient mechanical device - the paternoster (a kind of continuous vertical conveyor belt) - allows clothes, accessories and exhibits, originating in a subterranean robotized warehouse, to be circulated and deposited anywhere within the tower's 100m height. The exhibition is never static and never needs to close to re-organise. Under the direction of, not a curator but an EDITOR, the fashion tower becomes a new way of communicating fashion - as if the pages of a magazine are laid out in the spaces of the city. The editor uses the fashion tower to simultaneously communicate speculative and retrospective ideas : Exhibition is no longer constrained by the architecture of its container, but fully liberated by it.
A 100 metre tall museum and a ‘loose-fit’ programme present unique organizational challenges. The fashion tower addresses this by splitting the movement system into two components : 1. a continuous slow unfolding vertical landscape containing exhibition, which unfolds into events such as an auditorium, runway, bar and nightclub.[[tetra diagram]], 2. a supporting inner skewer of containment and rapid infrastructure (human and mechanical). High speed lifts transport humans, whereas the revival of an ancient mechanical device - the paternoster, (a kind of continuous vertical conveyor belt) [[diagram]]allows clothes, accessories and exhibits, originating in a highly organized subterranean robotized warehouse, to be circulated and deposited anywhere within the tower’s 100m height. [[diagram]]. Via the paternoster, the ‘archived’ items become part of the constantly changing exhibition but also have the potential to become shop stock, either directly or through influence.
We introduce a 100m metre tall vertical shop, sculpted like a giant totem pole to allow relationships between the paternoster and the public at key points in each district. At every ‘shop’ level, the public will be able to access the museum’s data base to interactively visualize influences, trends and genealogies of individual pieces, calling items from the paternoster, composing outfits, dressing in them and projecting their own image onto the interior of the media skin. The exhibition is never static and never needs to close to re-organise. Under the direction of, not a curator but an EDITOR, the fashion tower becomes a new way of communicating fashion – as if the pages of a magazine are laid out in the spaces of the city [[diagram]]. The editor uses the fashion tower to simultaneously communicate speculative and retrospective ideas : Exhibition is no longer constrained by the architecture of its container, but fully liberated by it.
Five different ’districts’ are separated vertically by open landscaped public spaces - moments of pausing, orientation and reflection - landmarks throughout the vertical journey. The districts can operate independently or as one continuous experience, allowing different layers of public involvement and providing multiple commercial opportunities for event hosting and organization. Transitions between districts always occur through the infrastructural skewer, meaning accessibility can be completely controlled to any part of the tower. Districts can therefore operate on independent time frequencies. The ground plane is left open, forming a new street level public space off Omotesando Street, landscaped to encourage viewing of the external runway, suspended 3 metres up. The main internal runway, which projects out over the space, allows public viewing when the media façade is not switched on. The fashion tower is effectively able to be read as a vertical piece of the city, with streets, public spaces, shortcuts and mechanical rapid transit devices.
Each district is wrapped in continuous stainless steel lamellae with integrated LEDs, able to simultaneously communicate media both externally to the city, and internally to the museum. There is no bottom, top or sides, only a single skin, able to communicate in infinite directions. By varying density and proximity to the glass façade behind the lamellae also act as solar shading to the glass facade. [[diagrams]] The combination of experiential ideas behind this project yield an architecture which generates an extraordinary silhouette. This will become recognizable as an international symbol of fashion, initiated in Tokyo but representative of status of world fashion capital - both unique and ubiquitous. Ultimately, like much of its content, the fashion tower and the experience it embodies, becomes a global brand.
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The city of Brussels plays host to two highly significant institutions in close physical proximity, the European Union and the Belgian Judiciary. However, both manifest disruptive and segregational urban tendancies rather than any real sense of inclusion. Through the re-consideration of the courthouse, we analysed an opportunity to stimulate the urban realm in a more inclusive direction and to potentially re-focus the expression of Brussels as European Capital.
Stimulus
The courthouse becomes a stimulus - a means to activate the area (which already has a specific ‘charge’), in a divergent direction. Can we put that ‘charge’ to good use - to maintain it, but to effect integration and really make it belong to the city? This involves reconsidering the European strip - instead of a singular mono-functional strip, can it become connected to a bigger poly-functional zone of the city, charged with activity, recognizable and distinct, yet fully connected and inclusive? Between the judicial area and the EU strip are cultural, governmental and touristic institutions : the Chamber of Representatives, the Senate, the House of Members of Parliament and Representatives, the Flemish Parliament, the Royal Palace, the National Library, the Arts Mountain, the Palace of the Arts, the Royal Museum of Fine Arts, the Royal Film Archive. Considered together, this zone forms a great ‘L’, hinged around the park and the palace. With the judicial programme reconsidered, the ‘L’ has the potential to become a hybrid of public activity. For the first time an integrated and co-existent zone belonging to both Brussels and Europe.
Unity and Diversity
We are not presenting a definitive architectural proposition, instead we are exploiting the proto-urban potential of the courthouse. The potential it holds, as a node, to activate this part of city in a new direction. We are not explicit in the exact functional disposition which will replace the judicial programme of the courthouse. This would be counterintuitive to our aim of de-institutionalisation and integration. We think the reinvented building should express Brussels’ relationship with Europe as symbiotic and should represent both the EU, Brussels and their collaboration as an evolving, non fixed thing, where the stakeholders are literally everyone who ever uses the streets of Brussels. This may lead the future use of the building in many different directions, however, to start the activation process, the new courthouse programme should incline toward public, cultural, educational and entertainment uses. Perhaps some of the publically orientated parts of the EU : maybe specifically the Institute for Multi-Lingualism and the Centre for Advanced Studies which emerged from the 2001 ‘Think Tank’, but also less specific programmes : the book fairs, art shows, film contests, museums proposed by Eco, Vidarte, Jaoui and Geremek, mixed with leisure, retail and supportive administrative spaces. Activities for all stakeholders, Brussels citizens, 'Eurocrats', visitors and tourists , hosted in one hybrid structure. It is significant that the latest ‘European’ building would involve no new construction – but instead would rely solely on the historic fabric of Brussels. Symbolically, Brussels gives one of its most significant buildings to the EU and, equally symbolically, the EU would rely on the very fabric of the city to play out its political role. Architecturally, the questions of quality of the EU buildings, their fast obsolescence and our inability to “assume contrast between 19th Century typology and scale of the new institutions” as identified by Koolhaas, are avoided.
Integration
The courthouse is the product of a previous age. Its existing huge mass is segregational, disruptive, and understandably over formal. As a landmark, it is highly charged with symbolic value, but completely under-connected to the surrounding city. We are proposing a strategy of occupation of its giant plinth by ‘the city’- of ‘de-institutionalisation’. By subtle and strategic erasure of structure in the sub-plinth levels, we create two new horizontal voids, morphing the city and the site. The complex topography of the area is resolved using mainly existing stairs and spaces of the building. The area becomes urban, with streets where there once were corridors - a permeable pedestrian precinct - a completely new part of the city. Above the plinth, the courthouse behaves as a poly-functional ‘building’. Streets give way to foyers security issues and ‘opening hours’ are observed, but public programmes are introduced to the ‘city’ below through the vertical voids and courtyards. The entire structure becomes a hybrid of city and building.
No Architecture
Our proposal involves minimum disruption to the fabric of the building - a fundamental shift in the relationship between the building and the city, effected without construction, only minimal erasure. A strategy built on the premise that the EU, Brussels and their co-existence as a European capital can and should be represented, not by permanent or formal monumentalisation, but by a subtle yet highly symbolic re-adjustment of territorial attitude. An attitude which is respectful to host and hosted, fully inclusive of all stakeholders and un-consumptive.
The adaptation of a 1930s South Edinburgh semi-detached house refocusses the internal spaces away from the street and toward the rear garden. An existing unused square of space behind the garage is absorbed into a new strip of accommodation along the rear elevation. The new strip, containing living, dining,kitchen and utility spaces, opens onto a terrace which acts as a new type of territory, fully engaged with the house interior but neither fully house nor fully garden.
The scheme for low cost housing in Angola, is based on a concept of interdependency of housing communities and arboriculture, with a view to creating economic opportunity and social sustainability. The community is organised around a 10mx10m grid of trees, structured into neighbourhoods of varying species, principally banana, moringa and palm. In advance of house construction, irrigation channels and ground tanks are dug and the exact displaced volume of earth used to construct rammed earth walls. The walls define each housing plot. Three trees are planted per plot, with the yield being written into the legal tenure arrangement. Houses are assembled as adaptable kits without mechanical plant or scaffolding. A series of sliding translucent screens alter the physical and perceptive relationships between 'interiors' and patios. Roofs direct rainwater to the ground tanks, which can store 140% of the rainy season rainfall, ready for irrigation during the dry season.
A rooftop addition to a top floor tenement flat on the edge of Holyrood Park, Edinburgh. The project provides a possible model to sustain family life in the city centre, avoiding the migration to the suburbs that typically follows increasing demand for interior space and desire for a garden. In this particular case, two studios for the two university professor clients face each other over a contained garden. In addition to work space, the scheme provides play space for children, a barbecue area, an outdoor cinema and a vegetable allotment.
An apartment above the studio, in the building designed by Basil Spence in 1957, is currently being painstakingly renovated. All construction is undertaken personally by Andy and the site serves as an ongoing laboritory, allowing ideas and details to be developed, tested and translated into the studio's work. The project is simultaneously restoration and alteration, with one eye on the spirit of the admirable capabilities of Spence, and the other on how the resolution of the modernist housing paradigm, which brought it into being, might be improved on in the 21st Century.
artwork
Collaborating with artist Alex Hamilton, the studio was invited to submit an artwork proposal for the external courtyard of a school in Fortrose, Scotland. Our strategy was 'anti-monumental', focussing on the opportunity to examine interfaces between art and everyday school activity. Instead of placing a mute object in the middle of the courtyard, as was expected, we proposed a collegiate style lawn and a grid of cherry trees, encouraging the social use of the space, while the surrounding facades became reactive and communicative. Like giant notice boards they display exemplary and inspirational work, communicate messages, sounds, music, artwork, literature, ideas, feedback - a creative symbiosis is set up between the physical fabric of the school and the student attitudes which define it and are defined by it.
TEXT COMING SOON

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TEXT COMING SOON
A competition for high density housing in Aomori, Japan led to a search for an architectural 'substance'; a continuous urban matrix where structures are merged and perception of inside and outside is deliberately confused. Two hundred individual houses or one big house? An altered gradation of publicity and privacy creates a less territorial and more communal environment with absolutely no residual spaces. Housing units are on three floors of a 7m x 7m plan, subdivided into four squares. One of the squares is a full height void, surrounded by a series of accommodation platforms, the top of which is the living space (half inside, half outside) with views across the faceted roofscape. At ground level, two squares are always 'open', allowing continual passageways which open onto shops, studios or workspaces.
TEXT COMING SOON
Sitting within the playground of a school, the frame was constructed in 1947 to restrain the unstable gable of an adjacent tenement. Integrity of the open frame is maintained by a glazed perimeter and inhabitation achieved by the insertion of 'floating' boxes containing the most private accommodation. The positioning of the boxes generates the spacial heirarchy within the homes. In an interesting concession to the street, the structure is constructed in three bays, two portal frames to the rear and one post and beam arrangement to the front. This suggested that the structure wanted a facade. Flats are entered through the facade, via bridges from the landings of a stair springing from the street. Accommodation comprises two flats on the first floor and a flat, studio and roof garden on top. The playground is maintained underneath.
An apartment building and supermarket on the edge of a park. The apartment building is 'anti-solid', simply expressed as a series of thick unorthogonal vertical gables, allowing the park to visually continue around and through the building. Thinner floor slabs are slung between the gables and the resultant grid is infilled with glass screens which vary betwen clear, opaque, openable and fixed, depending on the accommodation behind. The existing single storey supermarket is continued as a solid base to the apartments, its new more fluid form creating entrances to the lobby, car park and loading bay. A new glazed supermarket elevation enlivens the currently hostile car park space.
picardy place
The studio's first venture into speculative housing, borne out of the desire to find a viable and sustainable alternative to conventional speculative development. On this occasion, four houses were designed within exactly the same parameters as conventional volume developments. Each house was presented in three parts : a 'site works' model showing foundations, concrete and masonry; a bag of parts to be sold as a kit; and lastly, the completed model. With costs ranging from £80,000 to £153,000, the houses represented a programme for change in house building, but further suggested a greater polemical agenda concerned with the architect's role within a new cultual framework. Lack of interest from developers eventually prompted the studio to set up anabo in 2008, a company with an objective to re-examine from scratch established ideas of buying, selling, branding and communication within the housebuilding industry.
3,800 sqm of architecture centre; 19,000 sqm of office space. It was clear that the brief required a large commercial armature to support a small cultural core. Rather than dressing an office building as an architecture centre, or housing an architecture centre within a portion of the office building, we decided to separate the components into two distinct conditions : topography (architecture centre) and suspended slab (offices).The architecture centre literally becomes an extension of the Edinburgh landscape, which gives such vitality to the city's unique urban specificities. The office slabs float above as the opposite condition, a universal layer-cake of slabs, orientated to strengthen the existing urban pattern and to create a new public place as an extension of the Haymarket junction and railway station. The space between the two conditions mediates and becomes a concourse, extending the public place into a library, Imax cinema, shops, restaurants, bars and the stances of a new bus station. A pedestrian link with the nearby Edinburgh International Conference Cenre was also proposed.
The project involved the creation of new office space for the Edinburgh Old Town Renewal Trust within an existing 18th Century building on Edinburgh's Royal Mile. A history of sub-division and alteration had left a complex property with convoluted circulation. The three key components in the scheme were : a void in the centre of the plan acting as a circulation hub, a raised garden terrace and a re-discovered close which had become absorbed into the building over time. These three inter-related components, along with a system of glass walls, brought a legibility and efficiency to the new plan as well as visually connecting the internal spaces with the dense fabric of the surrounding medieval street pattern. The programme of the Trust became knitted into the fabric of the Old Town. The institution and the urban system it was set up to protect became permanently inter-dependent. The scheme was never realised.
The first project, undertaken while still a student in Edinburgh, involved the conversion of the roofspace of an upper floor flat in a 1939 two storey block. A double height space is introduced into the centre of the house at the point where the existing and new stairs meet. The new addition into the roof is broken down into three bays to avoid the costly use of steel, with the centre bay projecting forward to provide a small balcony and, compositionally, to line up with the entrance below.
This section, through examining four residential projects, illustrates a range of approaches for individual residential commissions. These approaches are common, but by no means exhaustive. Every project is unique.
The studio will work with you in discovering the best strategy for building or improving your home and will follow the implementation of this strategy from inception to completion.

Click on the images opposite to examine each of the four projects.

Click here to see a broader selection of the studio's house and housing projects.
Potentials can be unlocked in the most unlikely of sites. Illustrated is a 2005 project to develop a landlocked site with a highly restrictive planning brief and a history of failed applications. Through analysis, a strategy of 'fusing house and garden spaces together into one unified matrix' allowed light and nature deep into the site and resolved overlooking and privacy issues, creating a family home on a small, awkward urban site.
Originally commissioned for a large single extension, we analysed the very specific client requirements alongside the fairly fatal design problems of the existing house. Instead of extension, we proposed a strategy of holistic reorganisation and some extrusion. The budget was evenly distributed around the property rather than being sunk into one statement addition, which could never resolve, and may even exacerbate, the issues of the existing house. Three distinct, but communicating, territories for three generations of family are created, with an attempt to raise awareness of the unique site from within each territory.
Sometimes there is the requirement for a singular cellular addition, which can be added with minimum modification to the existing house. This project involved an additional shower room, laundry and bedroom, flexible enough to adapt into a self-contained work suite with its own independent street entrance.
Most residential alteration projects involve additional space requirements. Here, we challenged the convention of rear expansion of a modest terrace in a seaside town in Scotland, replacing an existing addition which contributed little spacially, and compromised the main living space's relationship with the garden (and by extension the sea). The interior was modified and extruded, giving a better arrangement of spaces, a larger living / dining area and a re-engagement of the garden over a terrace with sea views.
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